• Where is Native American Student Services located?

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    NASS is in room 5 of the Centennial Building, also known as the Adult Learning Center at 2145 Louisiana. There is parking in the back, near the new baseball field.

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  • Who is eligible for NASS services?

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    To enroll with Native American Student Services, a student must either:

    1)  Have their own Tribal ID, CDIB or other acceptable documentation, or

    2)  Use their parent's Tribal ID, plus the student's birth certificate, used in combination

    Students must also fill out:

    1)   A Title VII 506 form, which can be found on the NASS Forms link or in NASS office, and

    2)   A current Family Sheet, available in the NASS office

    If one has questions about enrolling in NASS, please contact the NASS office.

     

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  • What kinds of services does NASS provide?

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    School Supplies

    Each year, NASS strives to provide school supplies for each of our student. At the elementary level, NASS provides the required school supply list.  At the secondary level (middle and high schools), there is no centralized list for all schools, as each teacher and school decides for themselves. We do try to get most things secondary students need, but there may not be funding for each specific item.

     

    Tutoring

    Middle & High School      NASS holds a study hall-type tutoring in the evening for our secondary students in the NASS office. The NASS Tutoring Center is open from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays.   Students also have available if needed during this time: school computer, printer, poster board, displays for projects, calculators. All subjects, as well as test-taking practice and organizational skills are available.

     

    Mentors

    NASS provides, through its funding, a club sponsor for both high schools' Native American clubs (LHS Inter-Tribal Club & Free State Native Club). Having personnel designated to work with our teenagers is a priority for the program.  NASS hopes to continue to grow this part of our programming in the future by adding cultural mentors/advocates to work with all grade levels in the future.

     

    Advocacy

    Many times NASS families need some extra help navigating the school district's system. Whether it is having another person there at an IEP meeting or Parent/Teacher conference, to needing assistance filling out forms, NASS staff can assist as best as we can. If there are curriculum choices that make your students uncomfortable (inappropriate representations of Indigenous people, assumptions about Thanksgiving, etc.) NASS staff can help guide the conversations with the school's personnel in a meaningful way.

    Summer Academy

    For kids leaving grades K-5, NASS offers a day camp in June. This half day/afternoon program offers academic enrichment, team building, self-advocacy, and fun activities-all infused with a multi-layered Indigenous sensibility.  Our Summer Academy staff is made up of certified teachers, college age interns, para educators, along with special guests from the community.

     

    Teacher Professional Development

    Jennifer Attocknie, NASS Coordinator, goes into the schools and presents professional development sessions to teachers, administrators and mental health personnel on topics such as Native American Learning Styles, Cultural Miscommunications and Incorporating American Indian Literature/Subjects into the Classroom.

     

     

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